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Creating Dynamic Routes at runtime in Rails 4

I was working on a fairly simple site that has a content management component to it and wanted to find a way to dynamically generate the routes to the pages that were managed on the back-end by the site authors. This article presents an alternative to the usual approach of creating a catch-all route in the routes.rb by generating specific routes to each and every page. ## Preamble Sometimes, its faster to re-invent the wheel than to figure out thousands of lines of other people's code. Rails is great in that way -- you can look at the ecosystem and find lots of great pre-existing solutions or you can roll your own in very short order when the requirements are clear and precise. Such is the situation I found myself in while trying to get one of the… read more


What makes a top award candidate, anyhow?

In our local Linux user group mailing list, one of the participant asked the group for recommendations for open source software projects that should be considered for a prominent publication's top 100 awards. The ensuing discussion got me to wondering: What is the purpose behind doing the awards? Most of what I see talked about are all well-known and well-used, such as git, mercurial, word press, joomla, django, and so on. Usually, when I look at a list like this, I'm looking to uncover new and undiscovered projects that have real potential to make a real impact in my daily life and thus was somewhat surprised that such mature projects are being so heavily promoted in the discussions. Its not that I don't think these tools are worthy contenders. Most of them, I have used fairly extensively myself over the… read more


One ActiveRecord Model Acting as a List and Tree

Occasionally, Rails can appear to make your life extremely easy while silently throwing you a curve-ball. I needed a model that required a hierarchy while also preserving order of the records. Although fairly straightforward to set up and start immediately using, there are a couple of "gotchas" to watch out for and this article covers those pitfalls and shows how to apply the cool new "dirty attributes" feature in ActiveRecord. ## The Problem I am working on a content management system (CMS) where I want the pages to have a hierarchical structure that turns into a menu with sub-menus. The content manager needs to also be able to order these pages so that the menu structure renders in the desired order. ## The Solution Two plugins jumped to mind almost immediately: **acts_as_tree** and **acts_as_list**. The tree plugin will manage the… read more


Rails vs. Ramaze Performance Comparison

One of my biggest concerns of late is that my "more than just a little trivial" Rails projects seem to find their way straight into the heavyweight category in no time at all. While I am quite hopeful that Merb being the 3.0 version of Rails will resolve many of the issues I face today, I have no idea when I can truly count on Rails 3.0's arrival at the party. Thus, I have begun looking at other frameworks that are available today. ## Introducing Ramaze One I found is [Ramaze][1]. I have to say that Ramaze is a very minimalist approach to a framework that is actually rather enlightening. For one coming from a Rails' world, it can feel a bit sparse at first. But lately, I'm attributing my lack of comfort to being put on my toes to… read more


Rails has and belongs to many (habtm) demystified

Every time I have to implement a many-to-many relationship between Rails models, I seem to have to figure out how to do it effectively all over again. Especially as Rails seems to evolve the relational hooks with better support and elegance. Here, I will show a has_and_belongs_to_many strategy that works well for me. Along the way, I'll expose a few other minor tricks, such as adding a custom inflector for pluralizing your model or not adding the ID column on a table declaration. The following Browser Edit form is what we're going for. That is, having a list of Operating Systems to check off while editing a Browser object: ![Editing Browser View][1] First, the models: What I wanted, was a way to declare browsers (Firefox, Explorer, Opera, etc.) and associate them with one or more operating systems (OS X, Windows,… read more


DRYing your Views

Let me start out by saying that I am finally beginning to understand a bit about that magical Ruby block notion and how implementing methods through block passing can really empower you as a Ruby developer. Thanks to, a most excellent [Ruby tutorial][1], I am definitely feeling a good bit more empowered about getting my Views in Rails all DRY'd up. The problem: I wanted to introduce a property editor metaphor for the website I'm working on where properties could expose edit forms for just about any situation, much like wordpress' widget interface does. That is, there's an area of the current page that shows basic information about the property in a read-only (and preferably compact) form, and user could click an "edit" button and exposed an editable version of the properties. The "edit" link becomes a "cancel" link, which,… read more


A model-free wizard

Maybe I'm taking the whole MVC thing too far, but I've been reading and learning both Ruby and Rails at a fairly fast clip and just when I thought I was getting the hang of what goes in models, views, and controllers respectively, along comes The Advanced Recipe for Rails book with a recipe for implementing a wizard that threw me for a loop here. This implementation just so happens to be based off acts_as_state_machine, which plugs into your model classes. And of course, the acts_as_wizard plugin wasn't too far behind! Well, asking myself whether the wizard logic *should* be allowed to bleed over into the model prompted me to see just how hard it was to build a wizard in a web interface anyhow (this is my first attempt at a multi-step workflow bit on the web). Most of… read more